WORLD’S BIGGEST DENTAL STEMCELL BANK

Dental pulp stem cells

Dental pulp is the central soft tissue of a tooth. It is one of the most valuable sources of Mesenchymal Stem Cells. Mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs are a different type of stem cell that form the building blocks of the structural tissue (bone, cartilage, muscle, and fibrous tissues) of our body.
MSCs could be used in the treatment of conditions such as:
Degenerative arthritis
Heart disease
Diabetes
Traumatic injuries
Birth defects
Burns
Liver disease
Multiple Sclerosis
Autoimmune diseases (such as Crohn’s disease or rheumatoid arthritis)
Cancers
Together with Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs), they can enhance the treatment of leukemia, lymphoma and other diseases.


Stem Cells

Stem cells are the mother/master cells which can convert into all other cells, tissues, and organs in the body. Even though they are present in millions during the development of fetus, stem cells begin to diminish soon after birth. There are almost no circulating stem cells in adult blood. Scientists have harnessed the potential of stem cells to convert into any other cell type in the body to repair or replace damaged or lost cells, an approach that is collectively called “cell therapy”. To date, over 50 life-threatening diseases, including cancers and genetic disorders have been treated with stem cells, with and many additional diseases being researched. As told earlier,
Stem cells are the building blocks for our bodies. With their ability to transform into specialized cells, these master cells act as a repair system for the body, replenishing blood, tissue, and organs.
In some diseases or as a result of chemotherapy, these cells die and need to be replaced. Stem cells are a fascinating and powerful type of cell that can self-renew indefinitely, or give rise to differentiated cell types. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.


Why preserve stem cells

Preserving stem cells involves controlled lowering of temperatures from room temperature to temperatures ranging between -172 to -196 degrees centigrade. This process is called cryopreservation. At such lower temperatures every biological activity happening at a cellular level are paused inducing a kind of dormancy which prevents the cells from both aging or dying. This particular property of stem cells makes them incredibly precious at the time of treatments.



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